• Réduire le texte
  • Rétablir taille du texte
  • Augmenter le texte
  • Imprimer

The Mathematics of Animal Life:  How Many Paternal Centrioles are Needed to Have a Baby?

The figure shows Drosophila spermatids (left bottom) and spermatozoa (upper right) with typical and atypical centrioles (green).. © Inra, T. Avidor Reiss
Mis à jour le 29/05/2017
Publié le 16/05/2017
Mots-clés : CONFÉRENCES
The figure shows Drosophila spermatids (left bottom) and spermatozoa (upper right) with typical and atypical centrioles (green).. © Inra, T. Avidor Reiss
The figure shows Drosophila spermatids (left bottom) and spermatozoa (upper right) with typical and atypical centrioles (green). © Inra, T. Avidor Reiss

Tomer Avidor-Reiss, Ph.D, Associate Professor

University of Toledo, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Department of Biological Sciences

Mardi 20 juin 2017 à 13h15

Centre Inra Île-de-France-Jouy-en-Josas

Salle 271 du bâtiment 230

Summery paragraph:

The centriole is a subcellular organelle that forms the core of cilium and the centrosome, a center for microtubule organization. Paternal centrioles are essential for embryo development in most animals, including humans, other mammals, and insects. However, paternal centrioles undergo a process resulting in the loss of many proteins and structural characteristics during sperm differentiation. Therefore, the origin of the embryo centrioles is unknown. The Avidor-Reiss lab identified a novel atypical form of sperm centrioles that may resolve this enigma.

Sites: 

Invité par Geneviève Jolivet et Véronique Duranthon.