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Characterization of the bovine mammary gland epithelial lineage.

Coupe de glande mammaire de chèvre en gestation observée en microscopie optique.
Concours/exposition de photographies sur le thème « Arts et science » à Jouy-en-Josas en 2009.. © INRA, BEVILACQUA Claudia
Updated on 01/25/2018
Published on 01/18/2018
Keywords: CONFÉRENCES
Coupe de glande mammaire de chèvre en gestation observée en microscopie optique.
Concours/exposition de photographies sur le thème « Arts et science » à Jouy-en-Josas en 2009.. © INRA, BEVILACQUA Claudia
© INRA, BEVILACQUA Claudia

Laurence Finot

UMR Pégase - Physiologie, Envionnement et Génétique pour l'Animal et les Systèmes d'Élevage

Agrocampus Ouest, INRA, Saint-Gilles, France.

Thursday January 25 at 10 h
INRA Centre IdF Jouy-en-Josas
Chanteclerc meeting room, building 211

Abstract

The mammary gland is a dynamic organ that changes throughout the life of a dairy cow during the different lactation cycles. This dynamic is possible due to cell populations that make up the epithelium and in particular, adult stem cells located in the mammary gland. Through progressive steps of proliferation and differentiation, these stem cells give "birth" to different epithelial lineages (luminal and basal/myoepithelial cells) responsible for milk secretion. Up to today, studies have been focused on murine and human models and little has been done on cattle despite their importance in agronomy. The objective of this thesis is to determine what are the epithelial cells that are involved in the development of the bovine mammary gland at puberty and to identify the epithelial lieage, stem cells and more-or-less differentiated cells implicated. Using phenotypic (flow cytometry) and molecular approaches (gene expression, proteins, immunohistochemistry), we identified epithelial cell populations present in the mammary gland. Now we must characterise these cell populations using functional approaches such as xenotransplantation. Currently, the GFP-GM team, in partnership with the UMR PEGASE, is developing a transplantation method for bovine mammary gland cells in mice in order to characterize the capacity of these cells to recreate a mammary gland.

These studies are part of our research on the development of new animal models which will allow us to reduce experimentation on ruminants and to finely characterise the mammary gland cell populations.

Invited byFabienne Le Provost, UMR GABI